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Facts and stats about Jesus

  

Back in Sept 2010, I presented some facts and stats about God. It became apparently clear that the Bible teaches that the Father, whose name, according to the OT, is YHWH, is the only God. The Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit are not all God subsisting in one Godhead. YHWH of the OT, of whom Jesus continually addressed as Father – He is the only God; therefore, we’ve come to understand that God is truly unipersonal, not tri-personal.

If the Father is the only God, then what shall we say about the son? To say the Father is the only true God (Joh 17:3) as Jesus himself said, would be to exclude everyone else, including himself. The bible begins to indicate that Jesus is a unique human being, but not a mere, common man, but rather a perfect, sinless human being, likened after the 1st Adam (before the fall).

If Jesus is therefore a human being, how can he be God (or God the son)? The extra-biblical idea of dual-nature (hypostatic union) is nowhere explicitly stated, taught, mentioned or shown in Scripture. From the facts and stats that we’re going to see, it will become apparently clear that the Bible portrays Jesus, God’s son as a human being (biologically, physiologically).

Let’s see…

Matthew 1:1
518 times in the NT Jesus is given the title “Christ”
Χριστός – who is anointed, symbolizing appointment to a task

Matthew 8:20
79 times in the NT Jesus is described as the “son of man”
Ο υιος του ανθρώπου – descendant of mankind; offspring of the human race

Matthew 20:19 48 times in the NT Jesus is described as being “crucified”
σταυρoώ – to execute by nailing to a cross

Acts 3:15
48 times in the NT Jesus is described as being “raised” [from the dead]
εγείρει – to cause to stand up, to lift up, rouse awake a sleeping person

Matthew 4:3
44 times in the NT Jesus is described as the “son of God”
Ο γιος του Θεού – unique human being created by God; title given to God’s chosen king

Matthew 26:28
37 times in the NT Jesus is described as having “blood”
αίμα – the fluid that circulates in the principal vascular system of human beings

Acts 13:34
36 times in the NT Jesus is described as being “dead”
νεκρός – lifeless, deceased, corpse

Revelation 5:12
32 times in the NT Jesus is described as a “lamb”

Acts 13:28
29 times in the NT Jesus is described as experiencing “death”
θάνατος – to deprive a person of life, to exterminate, to cease completely from activity

Matthew 26:12
28 times in the NT Jesus is described as having a “body”
σώμα – the physical structure and material substance of a human being

Matthew 17:12
26 times in the NT Jesus is described as going to “suffer” or having “suffered”
πάσχειν – to undergo an experience that is met with suffering, pain

1 Thessalonians 2:15
24 times in the NT Jesus is described as wanting “to be killed” or being “killed”
ἀποκτεινάντων – to cause someone’s death; to lose one’s life; perish

Acts 1:22
22 times Jesus is described as being “resurrected”
ἀναστάσεως – coming back to life after having once died, arising

Luke 1:35
22 times in the NT Jesus is described as being “begotten”, “born” or given “birth” to
γεννώμενον – procreate, to cause to bring into existence; to father; to give birth

Romans 5:6
21 times in the NT Jesus is described as having “died”
ἀπέθανεν – no longer live; be deprived of life

Ephesians 2:15
19 times in the NT Jesus is described as having “flesh”
σάρκα – soft substance of a human body consisting of muscle and fat; physical; physical human being

Matthew 4:1
18 times in the NT Jesus is described as being “tempted” or “tested”
πειρασθηναι – put to the test, to try to trap, to cause someone to sin

Revelation 3:12
14 times in the NT Jesus is described as having “a God”

Revelation 5:6
4 times in the NT Jesus is described as being “slain”
ἐσφαγμένον – slaughter, put to death by violence

1 John 2:2
4 times in the NT Jesus is described as being our “propitiation”
ἱλάσμος – means by which sinners are forgiven and reconciled back to God; sin offering

John 19:36
2 times in the NT Jesus is described as having “bones”
οστά – the hard connective tissue forming the substance of the skeleton; this is where we get “osteopath”

John 19:37

2 times in the NT Jesus is described as having been “pierced”
ἐξεκέντησαν – to stab, puncture with a pointed instrument

Luke 22:44
1 time in the NT Jesus is described as having “sweat”
ιδρώτας – perspiration; water fluid excreted through the pores of skin

Conclusion

These are but just some facts and stats that we uncovered in our research of identifying who/what Jesus is. There are many more such hidden gems in the bible. When these stats were tallied, the result came to approx 1012. Over 1000 verses in the bible attest to the fact that Jesus is a human being, not a dual natured god man. Every NT writer knew what kind of person the Messiah would be: a uniquely begotten human being, God’s literal son and chosen king, who would announce the gospel of the imminent coming of God’s kingdom to the earth, of which Jesus was appointed to administer. No NT writer had understood Jesus in terms of 2 hypostases, a pre-existent 2nd member of a triune Godhead, eternally begotten son, etc. It is clear that the bulk of the NT data clearly identifies the son as a human being, as the son of God, not God the son, and certainly not God – for that would make him YHWH – and we know the Father is YHWH!

If you would like this article with the accompanied verses cited (for reference), please check out my PDF file which can be found here.

24 Responses to “Facts and stats about Jesus”

  1. on 17 Jul 2011 at 6:21 pmMatthew Elton

    Great facts and stats. The doctrine of the hypostatic union is based on a few difficult-to-understand verses. But we shouldn’t allow a few verses to overthrow the clear message of many.

    Luke 2:52 tells us that “Jesus increased in wisdom and stature, and in favor with God and man.” How could God increase in wisdom, when God is by nature omniscient?

    The clear message of scripture as a whole is that Jesus is the human Messiah, the Son of God.

  2. on 17 Jul 2011 at 6:24 pmXavier

    I long for the day when Christendome believes the clear, factual things of scripture and dispenses with the theoritical ones.

  3. on 19 Jul 2011 at 7:19 pmRay

    Not only was Jesus given blood, sweat, and tears as he took on our image and likeness, becoming as one of us, to redeem us, but he also is the one through whom all things were made, and that was by God’s design, a most wonderful thing in our eyes.

    When we add up all that is that is of God that is above all else that can be called God, doesn’t it add up to Jesus and the Spirit of God?

    Isn’t this the Word, as well as what it teaches us?

  4. on 19 Jul 2011 at 8:38 pmDoubting Thomas

    Ray,
    You asked, “Isn’t this the Word, as well as what it teaches us?”

    As Socinians we don’t believe that the bible teaches that Jesus was given blood, sweat, and tears as he took on our image and likeness. We believe that Jesus “really was” one of us. A fully human, but perfect man (the prophesied human Messiah), who was begotten in the womb of Mary. We also don’t believe that he is the one through whom all things were made. We believe that Jesus “only” pre-existed in that he was part of God’s original plan for humankind.

    The word begotten means to be brought into existence. Jesus was begotten in Mary’s womb. The Messiah was prophesied to be the human descendant of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and David. If Jesus pre–existed since before creation, that would mean that he existed before the first man and women, Adam and Eve. If Adam was the first man and Jesus existed before Adam, then it logically follows that Jesus cannot be a man.

    Otherwise Genesis is misleading us and Jesus was really the first man and not Adam…

  5. on 20 Jul 2011 at 2:50 amAntioch

    DT – I think the argument from the other side would say that Jesus pre-existed but not as a man. He added humanity at the incarnation. So, that would not violate Adam being the first man.

    But, I think this does cause another problem. There are Trinitarians who argue that their theory gets around one of the apparent contradictions in the Bible – whether God was seen or not. There are verses that seem to say both. The argument I have seen is that it was Jesus who was seen in the OT and not the Father, therefore, the Bible is not in contradiction. The Father was not seen, but Jesus was and because Jesus is also a man, then it is not a contradiction to say Jesus (the man) was seen but not God. However, if Jesus was not a man until the incarnation, then he would not have been a man during all the sightings in the OT. It could not have been Jesus’ man side that was seen since it didn’t exist yet.

  6. on 20 Jul 2011 at 10:03 pmDoubting Thomas

    Antioch,
    I want you to understand that I do respect people, like yourself, that believe in a pre-existent Y’shua. There are many references in Paul’s writings about Y’shua returning to heaven (implying that is where he came from), and there many references in John’s writings about Y’shua coming from heaven.

    There are also some other more specific verses like John 17:5; “And now, Father, glorify me in your own presence with the glory that I had with you before the world existed.”

    From what I understand the Socinians would say that Jesus was praying for the promised glory that was promised from the beginning in God’s great plan. Fortunately I don’t have to deal with these contradictions since I don’t study the writings of Paul or John. According to the Synoptics Jesus did not return to heaven or come from heaven or share glory with God before the world existed, or any of these other things.

    The books and letters that I study leave me with a very clear Socinian view of Y’shua.

    You said, “There are Trinitarians who argue that their theory gets around one of the apparent contradictions in the Bible – whether God was seen or not. There are verses that seem to say both.”

    From what I understand of the Socinian position the times that the O.T. talk about people seeing God, like when Jacob wrestled with God, they were actually seeing an Angel who was acting as God’s agent. They never actually saw God himself. Even when Moses saw God he only was allowed to see God from behind. He wasn’t allowed to see God’s face. I’ve heard some Socinians say that even this was an angel and not actually God.

    You also said, “He added humanity at the incarnation.”

    I understand the Trinitarians believe that Y’shua was God before all creation and the J.W.’s believe that Y’shua was the angel Michael. I’m just wondering what do a Biblical Unitarians believe Y’shua was before he was manifested into a human???

    Peace and Grace…

  7. on 21 Jul 2011 at 12:59 amJoseph

    Antioch,

    However, if Jesus was not a man until the incarnation, then he would not have been a man during all the sightings in the OT. It could not have been Jesus’ man side that was seen since it didn’t exist yet.

    This is a great point. Jesus in the OT would have been the pre-existing God according to the Trinitarians view, and therefore this would automatically discount Jesus as being part of some kind of Christophany, under the basis that no one has seen God. I remember Xavier bringing this up to our Trinitarian friend, Mark Taylor.

  8. on 21 Jul 2011 at 11:47 amAntioch

    DT – just to clarify, I am not a trinitarian, just being ‘devils advocate’ on my last post.

    I do tend to believe Jesus was NOT pre-existent, though I don’t profess to know for certain. I do puzzle over some of his statements but tend to interpret them as you have in your post.

  9. on 21 Jul 2011 at 10:40 pmDoubting Thomas

    Antioch,
    I didn’t realize you were just playing ‘devils advocate’. I had thought you once said that you believed in a pre-existing Y’shua. Like I said, “I do respect people that believe in a pre-existent Y’shua. I just don’t happen to agree with them. It is so difficult to try to keep track of what all the different people on this site have said.

    But, I do try as best as I can… 🙂

  10. on 21 Nov 2011 at 8:12 pmMarc Taylor

    From the article above:

    “To say the Father is the only true God (John 17:3) as Jesus himself said, would be to exclude everyone else, including himself.”

    For certain persons have crept in unnoticed, those who were long beforehand marked out for this condemnation, ungodly persons who turn the grace of our God into licentiousness and deny our only Master and Lord, Jesus Christ (Jude 1:4).
    Jude 1:4 teaches that the Christian has only one Master in heaven. The Christian’s only Master in this regard refers to the Father (Acts 4:24 ) and to the Son (2 Peter 2:1 ).

    When the Lord Jesus said the only true God in John 17:3 He wasn’t denying that He was God but was saying that the Father is the only true God in relation to false gods. The “true God” is always used in Scripture this way (2 Chronicles 15:3 ; Jeremiah 10:10 , 11; 1 Thessalonians 1:9 and 1 John 5:20 , 21).

    a. NIDNTT: in Jn. 17:3 , monos is linked with alethinos, true, in contrast to the deceptive appearance (pseudos) of all alleged gods and revealers (2:724, One – K.H. Bartels).
    b. Thayer: “ton theon, the one, true God, in contrast with the polytheism of the Gentiles” (Thayer’s Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament, ginwskw, page 117).
    c. Trench: But He is ἀληθινός (1 Thess. 1:9; John 17:3; Isai. 65:16; == ‘verus’), very God, as distinguished from idols and all other false gods, the dreams of the diseased fancy of man, with no substantial existence in the world of realities (Richard C. Trench, alethes, alethinos, #8) http://www.blueletterbible.org/lang/trench/section.cfm?sectionID=8
    d. Vine: John 7:28 ; 17:3 ; 1 Thess. 1:9 ; Rev. 6:10 ; these declare that God fulfils the meaning of His Name, He is “very God,” in distinction from all other gods, false gods (Vine’s Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words, True, page 1170).
    e. NIDOTTE – Asa demonstrated unquestionable religious zeal, even to the point of removing his own (grand)mother (cf. 1 Kgs 15:2 , 10) Maacah from her place ( 15:3 ) – no easy feat, to be sure, given the idolatrous tendencies his father had ( 15:3 ) (NIDOTTE 4:413, Asa – Daniel Schibler).

    My question for Unitarians then is who is your “only Master” (Jude 1:4) in heaven? Is it the Father (Acts 4:24) or is it the Lord Jesus (2 Peter 2:1)?

  11. on 22 Nov 2011 at 2:04 amTim (aka Antioch)

    …For us there is but one God, the Father, from whom all things came and for whom we live; and there is but one Lord, Jesus Christ, through whom all things came and through whom we live.

  12. on 22 Nov 2011 at 4:44 amMarc Taylor

    Great way to dodge the question.

  13. on 22 Nov 2011 at 10:57 amSarah

    When the Lord Jesus said the only true God in John 17:3 He wasn’t denying that He was God but was saying that the Father is the only true God in relation to false gods. The “true God” is always used in Scripture this way (2 Chronicles 15:3 ; Jeremiah 10:10 , 11; 1 Thessalonians 1:9 and 1 John 5:20 , 21).

    Two questions:

    1. Where in scripture do you believe Jesus first claimed to be God?

    2. When do you believe people first began to realize Jesus was God?

  14. on 22 Nov 2011 at 6:44 pmMarc Taylor

    Sarah,
    I asked first so please answer first. Here is the question again:

    My question for Unitarians then is who is your “only Master” (Jude 1:4) in heaven? Is it the Father (Acts 4:24) or is it the Lord Jesus (2 Peter 2:1)?

  15. on 22 Nov 2011 at 8:59 pmDoubting Thomas

    Marc Taylor,
    Since the son can only do the will of the Father, then the Father is obviously the Master!!!
    Y’shua is God’s representative, or agent, and as such is our Lord, King, and Savior…

  16. on 22 Nov 2011 at 9:27 pmMarc Taylor

    DT,
    The Father is the ONLY Master? 2 Peter 2:1 teaches the Lord Jesus is as well.

  17. on 22 Nov 2011 at 11:13 pmDoubting Thomas

    Marc Taylor,
    If you re-read what I wrote in msg. #15, you will see that this is exactly what I wrote above…

  18. on 22 Nov 2011 at 11:25 pmMarc Taylor

    And your citation for your assertion?
    Let me guess…..nothing as usual.

  19. on 22 Nov 2011 at 11:48 pmSarah

    Marc,

    I agree with you that “master” in Jude 1:4 is referring to Christ. But I disagree with you that this necessitates that Christ is God. Jesus and God are clearly distinguished in this verse. And the very same word for “master” is used to refer to human masters in 1 Peter 2:18. Both Jude and Peter are rightly giving their allegience to Jesus. But, as Paul reminds us in 1 Cr 15:27, it is plain that Christ’s role as master must be understood as given by and subject to God. Jesus is master and Lord of us only because God made him so:

    Act 2:36 “Therefore let all Israel be assured of this: God has made this Jesus, whom you crucified, both Lord and Christ.”

    Now that I’ve answered yours, what about my questions?

  20. on 23 Nov 2011 at 12:24 amMarc Taylor

    Sarah,
    In answer to your questions:
    1. Nathanael said to Him, “How do You know me?” Jesus answered and said to him, “Before Philip called you, when you were under the fig tree, I saw you” (John 1:48)
    a. NIDNTT: He sees Nathanael under the –> fig tree (1:48) and the thoughts and inner nature of man (2:25) (3:517, See – K. Dahn).
    b. Thayer: to know one, his person, character, mind, plans: Jn. 1.48 (49); 2.24 (Thayer’s Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament, ginwskw, page 117).
    2. See answer #1 although there is evidence that God was a multi-Personal Being in the OT (cf. Genesis 48:16).

    The NIDNTT reads: Belief in the one, only and unique God (Matt. 23:9; Rom. 3:30; 1 Cor. 8:4, 6; Gal. 3:20; 1 Tim. 2:5; Jas. 2:19) is an established part of primitive Christian tradition (2:73, God – J. Schneider). Jude 1:4 teaches that “the uniqueness of God can be applied without qualification to Jesus” (NIDNTT 2:725, One – K.H. Bartels). Unique is defined as “existing as the only one or as the sole example; single; solitary in type or characteristics” (Webster’s Encyclopedic Unabridged Dictionary, page 1554) while qualification is defined as a “restriction” (page 1174).
    There is no restriction in that Christ shares in the “uniqueness” (singleness) of the “only one” God.
    In terms of human masters I specified the Master “in heaven”. The Christian has only one there.
    The fact that it applies equally to Christ necessitates that He is God. Otherwise we have two ontologically distinct Master’s there when the Bible teaches there is only one.

  21. on 23 Nov 2011 at 11:39 amSarah

    In terms of human masters I specified the Master “in heaven”. The Christian has only one there.

    Yes, but he is in heaven only because God first raised him there.

    You quoted Jn 1:48 as the place where the apostles believed Jesus was God. But, in the next two verses Nathanael clearly confessed Jesus as the SON of God and the King of Israel. Are you inferring that Nathanael equated the title “Son of God’ with being God?

    These disciples knew the OT well enough to know that it teaches God created man and that God is not a man (Hsa 11:9). So I find it very hard to believe that the disciples just “became aware” that Christ was actually God himself. This would have required some clear explanation. Observing his great knowledge was apparently enough to convince them he came FROM God (Jn 16:30), but this is clearly not the same thing as BEING God. Perhaps this is because he showed in other places that he wasn’t completely omniscient (Mark 5:30, Matt 24:36).

    Jude 1:4 teaches that “the uniqueness of God can be applied without qualification to Jesus” (NIDNTT 2:725, One – K.H. Bartels).

    With due respect to the author of that commentary, this quote is purely opinion, because the verse makes no such statement. Absolutely, God is entirely unique and supreme. And Christ represents the attributes of our unique God to the greatest possible degree that a human can. But this is still a representation and not God in the fullest sense. I would like to hear how you explain 1 Cr 15:27 if Jesus’ Lordship is truly equivalent to God’s and not subordinate to it.

  22. on 23 Nov 2011 at 3:34 pmMarc Taylor

    Only one Master in heaven for the Christian Sarah. Who is your Master in heaven?

  23. on 23 Nov 2011 at 4:46 pmSarah

    Only one Master in heaven for the Christian Sarah. Who is your Master in heaven?

    You have no basis for claiming that the term “master” is synonymous with God. Jesus is called master, yes, but he is clearly said to be at the right hand of the Father. Exactly the same principle as Genesis 41:40. Everyone obeyed Joseph because Pharoh made him his right-hand man. Joseph’s authority was given to him by another who was greater still. Jesus repeatedly said the very same thing about himself.

    How does 1 Cr 15:27-28 fit into the idea of co-equality?

  24. on 23 Nov 2011 at 6:37 pmMarc Taylor

    Sarah,
    Jude 1:4 clearly reads that Christ is our “only Master”. At the time of this writing Christ is in heaven. The Father was addressed as Master in Acts 4:24 – He too being in heaven.
    I can see why the Unitarian refuses to either give a defintive or non-contradictroy answer to the question as to who their only Master (despotees) in heaven is.

  

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